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The Global Humanitarian Overview

MENU: GHO 2018

The Global Humanitarian Overview is the most comprehensive, authoritative and evidence-based assessment of world humanitarian needs. The GHO is based on detailed analysis of comprehensive data from a wide range of sources, and face-to-face interviews with hundreds of thousands of people directly affected by humanitarian crises across the globe. Our global plan facilitates effective, rapid and coordinated responses to humanitarian crises, supporting prompt life-saving action by humanitarian agencies, generously financed by governmental, private and individual donors.

AT-A-GLANCE

Conflict remains the main driver of humanitarian needs, while natural disasters continue to cause many people to need emergency aid. Overall, more than 134 million people across the world need humanitarian assistance and protection – and more funding than ever before is required to help them. Humanitarian agencies are committed to becoming more effective, efficient and cost-effective in order to respond faster to crises and in ways more attuned to the needs of those they are trying to help. This year we are undertaking more comprehensive, cross-sectoral and impartial needs assessments and we will contribute to long-term solutions by partnering more closely with development agencies.

TOTAL PEOPLE IN NEED

135.3million

TOTAL PEOPLE TO RECEIVE AID

97.9million

TOTAL REQUIREMENTS

$25.2billion

FUNDING TRENDin Billions (USD)

01020302007201020132016

PEOPLE TARGETED TRENDin Millions

0204060801002005200920132017

Sources: OCHA, Financial Tracking Service

Photo: UNICEF/Thomas Nybo

Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh wade across a bamboo bridge, ferrying their belongings to higher ground, after their makeshift Balukhali refugee camp was flooded with torrential rain. Since late August 2017, hundreds of thousands Rohingya refugees have fled violence and persecution in Rakhine State, Myanmar.

FUNDING REQUIREMENTSBY COUNTRY

Humanitarian Response Plans are the products of collaborative efforts among most aid organizations working in a major crisis. They are based on shared information and analysis of affected people’s needs, and embody a strategic and prioritized approach to meeting those needs and helping people out of crisis. Furthermore, they entail operational planning, division of labour, and detailed costs for each part of the humanitarian response—thus also forming an appeal. Increasingly, for protracted crises, they take a multi-year view and involve development actors.

Click on the toggle button for each response plan below for additional information. Requirements and funding information will be updated regularly as information is received and plans are officially published and/or revised. For more information on funding plans, please visit the Financial Tracking Service website.

FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS

$25.2B

FUNDED AMOUNT

$14.3B

UNMET REQUIREMENTS

$10.9B

COVERAGE

56.6%

FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS

FUNDED AMOUNT

FUNDEDNOT FUNDED

%

Humanitarian Response Plans

Afghanistan$598.9 M$452.5 M75.5%Burundi$141.8 M$78.2 M55.1%Cameroon$319.7 M$123.2 M38.5%Central African Republic$515.6 M$249 M48.3%Chad$543.8 M$256.2 M47.1%Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)$1.68 B$740 M44.2%Ethiopia$1.18 B$648.7 M55.1%Haiti$252.2 M$28.2 M11.2%Iraq$568.7 M$502.8 M88.4%Libya$312.7 M$77.8 M24.9%Mali$329.6 M$172.9 M52.4%Myanmar$183.4 M$124.9 M68.1%Niger$338.3 M$164.1 M48.5%Nigeria$1.05 B$684.7 M65.3%occupied Palestinian territory (oPt)$539.7 M$224.9 M41.7%Somalia$1.54 B$840.3 M54.5%South Sudan$1.72 B$1.02 B59.2%Sudan$1.01 B$603.6 M59.9%Syria$3.36 B$2.09 B62.1%Ukraine$186.9 M$69.2 M37%Yemen$2.96 B$2.33 B78.6%

Regional Response Plans

Burundi RRP☰$391.2 M$47.5 M12.1%DRC RRP☰$547 M$77 M14.1%Nigeria RRP☰$156.6 M$47.1 M30.1%South Sudan RRP☰$1.53 B$338.3 M22.1%Syria (3RP)$5.61 B$2.78 B49.6%

Other Response Plans

Bangladesh$950.8 M$682.1 M71.7%Burkina Faso$90.3 M$54.1 M59.9%Democratic People's Republic of Korea$111.2 M$26.3 M23.6%Mauritania$116 M$71.6 M61.7%Pakistan$123 M$76.5 M62.2%Philippines$61 M$14 M22.9%Senegal$16.8 M$6.8 M40.2%

Sources: OCHA, Financial Tracking Service

Photo: OCHA/Giles Clarke

Young students sit in a former classroom at their local school in Saada City, Yemen which was destroyed during airstrikes in 2015. As of 2017, students continue to atttend classes inside of a UNICEF tent nearby due to the ongoing conflict.

RESOURCES

NEWS & UPDATES

21 Nov 2018

Cameroon: Insecurity and underfunding severely hamper scale-up of humanitarian response

15 Nov 2018

Ukraine: Funding urgently needed as humanitarians race to help millions through the long harsh winter

06 Nov 2018

Somalia: Upsurge in violence triggers new wave of displacement

MORE

KEY DOCUMENTSDOWNLOADGHO JUNE 2018 UPDATE [EN]GHO (JANUARY 2018) FULL: [EN] [AR] ABRIDGED: [CH] [FR] [SP]

MONTHLY UPDATES

PREVIOUS APPEALS

Photo: OCHA/Ivo Brandau

The Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Mark Lowcock, speaks with displaced women at Wege Camp in Pulka, North-East Nigeria. The Lake Chad region crisis is affecting some 17 million people. In north-east Nigeria alone, 8.5 million people need humanitarian assistance and more than 1.7 million people are internally displaced.

MAKE A CONTRIBUTION

Relief specialists consider financial contributions to reputable aid agencies as the most valuable and effective form of support in humanitarian emergencies. To make a financial contribution you can donate through:

COUNTRY-BASED POOLED FUNDS

Country-based pooled funds (CBPFs) allow governments and private donors to pool financial contributions to finance response to a specific emergency. They channel funds rapidly for scaling up humanitarian operations, filling critical gaps, and strengthening partnerships with aid organizations, including local and international NGOs. In 2016 the UN Secretary-General set a target for 15% of HRP funding to be channelled through CBPFs in the coming years.

DONATE

CENTRAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE FUND

The UN's Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) provides immediate funding for life-saving humanitarian action at the onset of emergencies and for crises that fail to attract adequate resources, wherever they are. CERF-funded interventions focus on the most urgent and life-saving priorities set collectively by humanitarian partners on the ground. In recognition of CERF’s impressive track record in enabling effective assistance to crisis-affected people, the UN General Assembly has endorsed an expanded funding target for CERF to $1 billion a year, and called on all stakeholders to consider increasing their voluntary contributions to the fund.

DONATE

DONATE IN-KIND RESOURCES AND SERVICES

The UN Secretary-General encourages companies to coordinate their response efforts with the United Nations in order to ensure coherence with priorities and to minimize gaps and duplication. To make an in-kind donation of goods or services visit www.business.un.org or write to pss@un.org with specific information about the contribution, including the timeframe for delivery and any conditions. Contributions must comply with the Guidelines on Cooperation between the UN and the Business Sector.

The United Nations enters into pro-bono agreements with companies which will provide direct assets or services during emergencies. Partnerships work best if established before a disaster occurs. Contact pss@un.org to discuss the ways in which your company might partner with the UN. As with in-kind contributions, business sector partnerships must comply with the Guidelines on Cooperation between the UN and the Business Sector.


Write to Us:

Advisory Committee: Yves Berthelot (France),  PV Rajagopal (India), Vandana Shiva (India), Oliver de Schutter (Belgium), Mazide N’Diaye (Senegal), Gabriela Monteiro (Brazil), Irakli Kakabadze (Georgia), Anne Pearson (Canada), Liz Theoharis (USA), Sulak Sivaraksa (Thailand), Jagat Basnet (Nepal), Miloon Kothari (India),  Irene Santiago (Philippines), Arsen Kharatyan (Armenia), Margrit Hugentobler (Switzerland), Jill Carr-Harris (Canada/India), Reva Joshee (Canada), Sonia Deotto (Mexico/Italy),Benjamin Joyeux (Geneva/France), Aneesh Thillenkery, Ramesh Sharma, Ran Singh (India)